arjuna-vallabha:

Color pencil work by Shashikant Dhotre

(via kartari)

Source: arjuna-vallabha

two-browngirls:

Saira Hunjan
I’ve loved Saira Hunjan since I started thinking about getting a tattoo but when I found out last year that she’d retired from tattooing I was so gutted! If I ever got a tattoo done, I’d only get it done from her. Why? Because she’s incredible, intricate and unique!
Check out her new collection for Ettinger  here
- S
two-browngirls:

Saira Hunjan
I’ve loved Saira Hunjan since I started thinking about getting a tattoo but when I found out last year that she’d retired from tattooing I was so gutted! If I ever got a tattoo done, I’d only get it done from her. Why? Because she’s incredible, intricate and unique!
Check out her new collection for Ettinger  here
- S
two-browngirls:

Saira Hunjan
I’ve loved Saira Hunjan since I started thinking about getting a tattoo but when I found out last year that she’d retired from tattooing I was so gutted! If I ever got a tattoo done, I’d only get it done from her. Why? Because she’s incredible, intricate and unique!
Check out her new collection for Ettinger  here
- S
two-browngirls:

Saira Hunjan
I’ve loved Saira Hunjan since I started thinking about getting a tattoo but when I found out last year that she’d retired from tattooing I was so gutted! If I ever got a tattoo done, I’d only get it done from her. Why? Because she’s incredible, intricate and unique!
Check out her new collection for Ettinger  here
- S
two-browngirls:

Saira Hunjan
I’ve loved Saira Hunjan since I started thinking about getting a tattoo but when I found out last year that she’d retired from tattooing I was so gutted! If I ever got a tattoo done, I’d only get it done from her. Why? Because she’s incredible, intricate and unique!
Check out her new collection for Ettinger  here
- S

two-browngirls:

Saira Hunjan

I’ve loved Saira Hunjan since I started thinking about getting a tattoo but when I found out last year that she’d retired from tattooing I was so gutted! If I ever got a tattoo done, I’d only get it done from her. Why? Because she’s incredible, intricate and unique!

Check out her new collection for Ettinger here

- S

(via benditlikebeckhamsadnessblog)

Source: sairahunjan.com

rabbrakha:


Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.
rabbrakha:


Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.
rabbrakha:


Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.
rabbrakha:


Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.
rabbrakha:


Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.
rabbrakha:


Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.
rabbrakha:


Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.
rabbrakha:


Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.

rabbrakha:

Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.

(via vsquaredk)

Source: baawri

Anonymous asked:
Ok so? Yeah there's a few pretty south asian people in the media but in general y'all tend to be the ugliest group of people on earth lol, sheesh learn how to take a compliment. It's a good thing that your turned out pretty whilst being born into one of the ugliest races on the planet

lovingymnastics:

siensmagique:

rabbrakha:

srsly, please get your head outta your ass and look around. you’re honestly embarassing yourself, being a total tool.

like y’all white ppl got

this

and

this

BUT NAAAAAAAAAAAAH,

YOU

ARE

TELLING 

ME

MY

PEOPLE

ARE

UGLY

?????

you are beyond gone, my friend.

that’s not even a compliment!!!!! that’s some bullshit you’re throwing at me, or anyone else for that matter. if you think that’s a compliment, telling me i’m pretty “for a south asian” i’d rather your lame bitch ass keep it to yourself. if someone’s attractive, then they’re just that: attractive. not attractive for a…..

you forreal are just so ignorant and messed up, smfh i pity you. i don’t understand how ppl like you still exist on this earth w/ this fucked up mindset thinking you can go around and tell ppl that they’re pretty for a…… person. i don’t have to be WHITE or have WHITE mixed in me to be considered beautiful, nor does anyone else. fuck your norms and standards, and get your bitch ass off my blog, and don’t you dare come back w/ this bullshit. 

As awesome as this post is, it would’ve been even cooler to show some of your darker skinned beauties.

and why not athletes who have inspired a nation of 1.3 Billion and more across the globe

image

image

image

image

image

notyourexrotic:


First of its kind in the world : Bharatanatyam (south Indian Classical Dance) on wheel ChairsInnovation and revolution in the history of classical dances of India.
Yes! This is the time to arise and awake and see to believe - an innovation and revolution in the history of classical dances of India. Performing Bharatanatyam on wheel chairs and use of wheels in place of legs has taken years and hours of hard work and innovative methodology. In this unique performance, one can witness indomitable spirit of these differently abled artistes in each movement dance.
Today it is our privilege that the most respected classical dance form Bharatanatyam can be performed by disabled people on wheel chairs. The complete adavu (steps), jathi (combination of advus), thirmanams (sequence of pure rhythmic dance composed of adavu-jathis) are reinvented on wheels and these are performed with absolute precision. Wheel chairs have great advantage to perform many steps, to mention a few like rangakramana adavu (covering the stage), bhramari (spins), jaru adavu (sliding), with speed and precision. The spinning speed of a wheel chair is faster than an accomplished dancer’s spins! The speed on wheel chairs is about 100 kms/hr. They have excelled both in Nritta and Nritya.

- Ability Unlimited, a non-profit in India that teaches classical Indian dance adapted for wheelchair use as therapy. Besides Bharatanatyam they also have Bagwatgeeta, yoga, “miracle” (where the wheels spin up to 150-200 km/h), Sufi dance, martial arts, Durga, Ramayana, and a whole bunch of others.
notyourexrotic:


First of its kind in the world : Bharatanatyam (south Indian Classical Dance) on wheel ChairsInnovation and revolution in the history of classical dances of India.
Yes! This is the time to arise and awake and see to believe - an innovation and revolution in the history of classical dances of India. Performing Bharatanatyam on wheel chairs and use of wheels in place of legs has taken years and hours of hard work and innovative methodology. In this unique performance, one can witness indomitable spirit of these differently abled artistes in each movement dance.
Today it is our privilege that the most respected classical dance form Bharatanatyam can be performed by disabled people on wheel chairs. The complete adavu (steps), jathi (combination of advus), thirmanams (sequence of pure rhythmic dance composed of adavu-jathis) are reinvented on wheels and these are performed with absolute precision. Wheel chairs have great advantage to perform many steps, to mention a few like rangakramana adavu (covering the stage), bhramari (spins), jaru adavu (sliding), with speed and precision. The spinning speed of a wheel chair is faster than an accomplished dancer’s spins! The speed on wheel chairs is about 100 kms/hr. They have excelled both in Nritta and Nritya.

- Ability Unlimited, a non-profit in India that teaches classical Indian dance adapted for wheelchair use as therapy. Besides Bharatanatyam they also have Bagwatgeeta, yoga, “miracle” (where the wheels spin up to 150-200 km/h), Sufi dance, martial arts, Durga, Ramayana, and a whole bunch of others.
notyourexrotic:


First of its kind in the world : Bharatanatyam (south Indian Classical Dance) on wheel ChairsInnovation and revolution in the history of classical dances of India.
Yes! This is the time to arise and awake and see to believe - an innovation and revolution in the history of classical dances of India. Performing Bharatanatyam on wheel chairs and use of wheels in place of legs has taken years and hours of hard work and innovative methodology. In this unique performance, one can witness indomitable spirit of these differently abled artistes in each movement dance.
Today it is our privilege that the most respected classical dance form Bharatanatyam can be performed by disabled people on wheel chairs. The complete adavu (steps), jathi (combination of advus), thirmanams (sequence of pure rhythmic dance composed of adavu-jathis) are reinvented on wheels and these are performed with absolute precision. Wheel chairs have great advantage to perform many steps, to mention a few like rangakramana adavu (covering the stage), bhramari (spins), jaru adavu (sliding), with speed and precision. The spinning speed of a wheel chair is faster than an accomplished dancer’s spins! The speed on wheel chairs is about 100 kms/hr. They have excelled both in Nritta and Nritya.

- Ability Unlimited, a non-profit in India that teaches classical Indian dance adapted for wheelchair use as therapy. Besides Bharatanatyam they also have Bagwatgeeta, yoga, “miracle” (where the wheels spin up to 150-200 km/h), Sufi dance, martial arts, Durga, Ramayana, and a whole bunch of others.

notyourexrotic:

First of its kind in the world : Bharatanatyam (south Indian Classical Dance) on wheel Chairs
Innovation and revolution in the history of classical dances of India.

Yes! This is the time to arise and awake and see to believe - an innovation and revolution in the history of classical dances of India. Performing Bharatanatyam on wheel chairs and use of wheels in place of legs has taken years and hours of hard work and innovative methodology. In this unique performance, one can witness indomitable spirit of these differently abled artistes in each movement dance.

Today it is our privilege that the most respected classical dance form Bharatanatyam can be performed by disabled people on wheel chairs. The complete adavu (steps), jathi (combination of advus), thirmanams (sequence of pure rhythmic dance composed of adavu-jathis) are reinvented on wheels and these are performed with absolute precision. Wheel chairs have great advantage to perform many steps, to mention a few like rangakramana adavu (covering the stage), bhramari (spins), jaru adavu (sliding), with speed and precision. The spinning speed of a wheel chair is faster than an accomplished dancer’s spins! The speed on wheel chairs is about 100 kms/hr. They have excelled both in Nritta and Nritya.

- Ability Unlimited, a non-profit in India that teaches classical Indian dance adapted for wheelchair use as therapy. Besides Bharatanatyam they also have Bagwatgeeta, yoga, “miracle” (where the wheels spin up to 150-200 km/h), Sufi dance, martial arts, Durga, Ramayana, and a whole bunch of others.

(via bhupalakpaneer)

Source: notyourexrotic

fuckyeahsouthasia:

This Unique Anti-Rape Protest by Women in India Has Shocked Kerala.
A group of women created a furore in India’s southern state of Kerala when they stood in public, wrapped in banners with anti-rape messages on them. But what message got conveyed through their unique protest?
India is still coming to terms with the news of the rape and lynching of two teenage Dalit girls in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, last month. The graphic images of the bodies hanging from a tree were widely circulated both online and offline heightening outrage and controversy around the incident.
The family of the two girls, who were cousins, alleged that men from the Yadav community (who are higher in the order of the Indian caste system vis-a-vis Dalits but are themselves classified under ‘Other Backward Castes’ or OBCs in many states) brutally raped the two girls when the two had gone to the fields to relieve themselves as they did not have a toilet in their home. Afterwards, they were hanged from a tree, which is where they were discovered the next morning.
Farah Naqvi, an activist working on public policy for rights of the most marginalized, wrote an op-ed in The Hindu newspaper, where she pointed out why lynching is done in societies.

these hangings were part of a public drum-beating semiotic of power; unspoken racial social laws enforced by terror.

While there were candlelight vigils, massive outpouring of sympathies and protests for the Delhi rape victim, most of the citizen voices have been strangely silent despite the many instances of rape that have come to light across the country since then.This incident too would have perhaps faded to the background, as is seen all the time when rape happens to Dalit women in India’s villages. However this time, since the photographs were widely circulated on social media (even though their circulation led to controversy) it jolted some from their slumber.
The sounds of the deafening silence, reverberated through Kerala as well, forcing people to question this overall lack of public outcry after this incident.
Rupesh Kumar, a filmmaker and a Dalit activist, asks about the silence of the media and of the society.


Are the candle shops closed? Or did an earthquake happen in Delhi? Or someone choked you? Your front pages were leased for something else? I am sure those are the reasons why there is this silence about the dalit women and I am sure it is not because they are Dalit. Only when it suits you, how disgustingly the word humanity is used.


A group of women, angry that nothing has been done yet, held a protest in the city of Ernakulam in Kerala, covering themselves with banners that were in tri-colors symbolizing the Indian flag. The ‘sthreekoottayma’ group that consisted of a small group of women, arranged this protest event.
People in Kerala were shocked to see women protesting by standing in the open wrapped in banners that left their shoulders and legs bare. Unfortunately, instead of mobilizing large-scale support for the case of the Dalit teenage girls, this unique act of protest was what caught eyeballs and was widely talked about. The police even arrested the protestors for indecent exposure.
Thasni Banu, who took part in the protest had this to explain.


We used our bodies to protest against people who are using women’s bodies as a political weapon. Without hearing our voices of protests and slogans, without understanding the apolitical climate which is permeating in the society, people are more worried about our bare shoulders and legs.
To those people who still think female bodies are the reason for rape, we mock at all those people, in the name of those girls who were raped and lynched in Uttar Pradesh.


Full report
fuckyeahsouthasia:

This Unique Anti-Rape Protest by Women in India Has Shocked Kerala.
A group of women created a furore in India’s southern state of Kerala when they stood in public, wrapped in banners with anti-rape messages on them. But what message got conveyed through their unique protest?
India is still coming to terms with the news of the rape and lynching of two teenage Dalit girls in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, last month. The graphic images of the bodies hanging from a tree were widely circulated both online and offline heightening outrage and controversy around the incident.
The family of the two girls, who were cousins, alleged that men from the Yadav community (who are higher in the order of the Indian caste system vis-a-vis Dalits but are themselves classified under ‘Other Backward Castes’ or OBCs in many states) brutally raped the two girls when the two had gone to the fields to relieve themselves as they did not have a toilet in their home. Afterwards, they were hanged from a tree, which is where they were discovered the next morning.
Farah Naqvi, an activist working on public policy for rights of the most marginalized, wrote an op-ed in The Hindu newspaper, where she pointed out why lynching is done in societies.

these hangings were part of a public drum-beating semiotic of power; unspoken racial social laws enforced by terror.

While there were candlelight vigils, massive outpouring of sympathies and protests for the Delhi rape victim, most of the citizen voices have been strangely silent despite the many instances of rape that have come to light across the country since then.This incident too would have perhaps faded to the background, as is seen all the time when rape happens to Dalit women in India’s villages. However this time, since the photographs were widely circulated on social media (even though their circulation led to controversy) it jolted some from their slumber.
The sounds of the deafening silence, reverberated through Kerala as well, forcing people to question this overall lack of public outcry after this incident.
Rupesh Kumar, a filmmaker and a Dalit activist, asks about the silence of the media and of the society.


Are the candle shops closed? Or did an earthquake happen in Delhi? Or someone choked you? Your front pages were leased for something else? I am sure those are the reasons why there is this silence about the dalit women and I am sure it is not because they are Dalit. Only when it suits you, how disgustingly the word humanity is used.


A group of women, angry that nothing has been done yet, held a protest in the city of Ernakulam in Kerala, covering themselves with banners that were in tri-colors symbolizing the Indian flag. The ‘sthreekoottayma’ group that consisted of a small group of women, arranged this protest event.
People in Kerala were shocked to see women protesting by standing in the open wrapped in banners that left their shoulders and legs bare. Unfortunately, instead of mobilizing large-scale support for the case of the Dalit teenage girls, this unique act of protest was what caught eyeballs and was widely talked about. The police even arrested the protestors for indecent exposure.
Thasni Banu, who took part in the protest had this to explain.


We used our bodies to protest against people who are using women’s bodies as a political weapon. Without hearing our voices of protests and slogans, without understanding the apolitical climate which is permeating in the society, people are more worried about our bare shoulders and legs.
To those people who still think female bodies are the reason for rape, we mock at all those people, in the name of those girls who were raped and lynched in Uttar Pradesh.


Full report

fuckyeahsouthasia:

This Unique Anti-Rape Protest by Women in India Has Shocked Kerala.

A group of women created a furore in India’s southern state of Kerala when they stood in public, wrapped in banners with anti-rape messages on them. But what message got conveyed through their unique protest?

India is still coming to terms with the news of the rape and lynching of two teenage Dalit girls in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, last month. The graphic images of the bodies hanging from a tree were widely circulated both online and offline heightening outrage and controversy around the incident.

The family of the two girls, who were cousins, alleged that men from the Yadav community (who are higher in the order of the Indian caste system vis-a-vis Dalits but are themselves classified under ‘Other Backward Castes’ or OBCs in many states) brutally raped the two girls when the two had gone to the fields to relieve themselves as they did not have a toilet in their home. Afterwards, they were hanged from a tree, which is where they were discovered the next morning.

Farah Naqvi, an activist working on public policy for rights of the most marginalized, wrote an op-ed in The Hindu newspaper, where she pointed out why lynching is done in societies.

these hangings were part of a public drum-beating semiotic of power; unspoken racial social laws enforced by terror.

While there were candlelight vigils, massive outpouring of sympathies and protests for the Delhi rape victim, most of the citizen voices have been strangely silent despite the many instances of rape that have come to light across the country since then.This incident too would have perhaps faded to the background, as is seen all the time when rape happens to Dalit women in India’s villages. However this time, since the photographs were widely circulated on social media (even though their circulation led to controversy) it jolted some from their slumber.

The sounds of the deafening silence, reverberated through Kerala as well, forcing people to question this overall lack of public outcry after this incident.

Rupesh Kumar, a filmmaker and a Dalit activist, asks about the silence of the media and of the society.

Are the candle shops closed? Or did an earthquake happen in Delhi? Or someone choked you? Your front pages were leased for something else? I am sure those are the reasons why there is this silence about the dalit women and I am sure it is not because they are Dalit. Only when it suits you, how disgustingly the word humanity is used.

A group of women, angry that nothing has been done yet, held a protest in the city of Ernakulam in Kerala, covering themselves with banners that were in tri-colors symbolizing the Indian flag. The ‘sthreekoottayma’ group that consisted of a small group of women, arranged this protest event.

People in Kerala were shocked to see women protesting by standing in the open wrapped in banners that left their shoulders and legs bare. Unfortunately, instead of mobilizing large-scale support for the case of the Dalit teenage girls, this unique act of protest was what caught eyeballs and was widely talked about. The police even arrested the protestors for indecent exposure.

Thasni Banu, who took part in the protest had this to explain.

We used our bodies to protest against people who are using women’s bodies as a political weapon. Without hearing our voices of protests and slogans, without understanding the apolitical climate which is permeating in the society, people are more worried about our bare shoulders and legs.

To those people who still think female bodies are the reason for rape, we mock at all those people, in the name of those girls who were raped and lynched in Uttar Pradesh.

Full report

(via himabean)

Source: globalvoicesonline.org

theafrocentrics:

yearningforunity:

Indigenous woman, India

Dat melanin 😍😍

(via himabean)

Source: yearningforunity

thetigerbeat:

British woman Harnaam Kaur started growing facial hair at 16 as a side effect of polycystic ovary syndrome. She tried waxing, shaving and bleaching before being baptised a Sikh, which forbids the cutting of body hair. Photograph: Brock Elbank/Barcroft Media

(via shabanasks)

Source: thetigerbeat

historicaltimes:

The first Indian Miss World, Reita Faria, signing a cap for US troops in South Vietnam, 1966

Reita Faria was the first Asian to win the Miss World title and went to entertain American troops in South Vietnam, apparently to the annoyance of the Indian government who were at the time supporting the North Vietnamese. Here she is aboard the USS Bennington on stage with Bob Hopemeeting the troops andgiving Yeoman Gerald Hampton a kiss (Hampton’s story here).

Faria later turned her back on a modelling career to complete her medical studies in Bombay and is the only Miss World to qualify as a doctor during her reign.

(via arulara)

Source: historicaltimes

officialnebulawade:

modelling101:

Neelam Johal for Vogue India

YAAAS

officialnebulawade:

modelling101:

Neelam Johal for Vogue India

YAAAS

(via octothot)

Source: modelling101

(Women in) the South Asian diaspora: resources

oiltipped:

Hey guys! So, in February I completed my dissertation on South Asian women in diaspora, focused on North America and England and the self-representation of this experience in literature. Getting access to certain material was a huge upside and this post has been sitting in my drafts for months. I intended for it to include a bunch of links, fictional recommendations, movie recommendations, all relevant to the topic, but I figured it’s worth posting the fraction I kind of neglected for a while. I’ll make another (complete) post in the near future with a lot added, all far more organised than this but for now, here are a few links that might be of interest. Not all of them are in full; a lot are just google book previews, but I wanted there to be at least some glimpse into the material, and to keep it as accessible as possible because a lot of the sources I used were pretty cut off and nauseatingly expensive.

It’s also worth noting that there’s a pretty huge prevalence to frame discourse on South Asians around India, and there are a lot of issues and topics (religions, ethnicities, implications of certain identities, actually) that get pushed to the sidelines - if discussed with enough nuance at all - so I apologise for this not being a more comprehensive list. I do hope there’s something somebody can glean from this little fraction of recommendations though, and I’m not an expert by far but my ask box is always open for anyone who wants to talk.

x

Read More

(via lankalychee)

Source: oiltipped

browngirls4bindis:

Mangala Tiffin Center (2012)
browngirls4bindis:

Mangala Tiffin Center (2012)

browngirls4bindis:

Mangala Tiffin Center (2012)

(via dancefloorpolitician)

Source: browngirls4bindis

biglittleprincess:

Shout out to all of the brown girls whose first time shaving wasn’t a joyful step into womanhood, but an occasion marked by the shame and grief of coming home from school and begging your mom to let you do it because the kids at school wouldn’t stop pointing and laughing

(via ladybrun-deactivated20140803)

Source: biglittleprincess

my-spirits-aroma-or:

Don’t Mess With Me
by Jas Charanjiva

my-spirits-aroma-or:

Don’t Mess With Me

by Jas Charanjiva

(via burfi)

Source: my-spirits-aroma-or